Another roadside vendor dish; it reminded me of Falooda. The five star luxury of Hotel Istana was great and the hospitality was superb, but being a typical Bongolander I found the roadside hawkers preparing satay, noodles, cendol, smiling and inviting “Selamat Datang” (welcome) more fascinating. The sights, sounds and smells were definitely more zestful and aromatic.

400ml cold water
7-8 medium pandan leaves
50g Hoen Kwe (green bean) flour. This is a pre-mixed flour made from moong dal.
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 pandan paste
1/4 tsp alkaline water
1 cup coconut milk
Crushed ice (as needed)
Palm sugar syrup (Take some jaggery or gur and dissolve in a cup of water to make a brown syrup – you can add regular sugar to make it sweeter).

Blend the pandan leaves with water and strain to get the pandan juice. Add pandan paste and blend well. Put the flour and salt in to a pan. Add the pandan juice in (1) and alkaline water. Use a hand whisk to stir well while adding cold water. Make sure the flour is dissolved into a smooth batter. Cook the mixture over a low fire. Keep stirring until the mixture becomes transparent and thick and remove from the fire.

Prepare a bowl of cold water. Then you can use a colander or a strainer with large holes and pour some of the mixture onto it. Push the Cendol mixture with a spoon so it drop into the water (if you’ve seen how they make ganthiya or sev at City Hotel or Purnima – you’ll know what I am talking about). Repeat until all green bean mixture finishes.

Serve the Cendol in a dessert bowl or tall glass with crushed ice and rich coconut milk and palm sugar syrup.


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